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Old 10-19-2009, 07:25 PM   #1
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Default Trail Tire Repair

Been doing this myself for a long time, but the rain got my motivated to goof-off in the garage today. I had to mount my spare still so I figured I'd take pictures. Maybe this would be a good sticky or something. I think this is about as important as knowing how to change a u-joint. Once you do a couple of these, a trail repair of a sidewall or a de-bead is really a cakewalk. I did this tire while taking pictures and eating chips in about 15 minutes.

These tools can all be substituted. Before I knew Harbor Freight sold these tire spoons for $6 a piece (sweet deal), I used 12" crescent wrenches, breaker bars, ratchets, flat stock, etc...I've been importing these spoons back to AK in my luggage for friends back home, so let me know if you'd like a set.

Bust the beads with a hi-lift. This shouldn't require much force. As I say with any step in this process, "If you're using a lot of force you're doing something wrong. Try a different approach."

If it's not popping off without a lot of force, release the jack and start in a new spot. Crusty rims may require you to walk the jack all the way around the bead. Now you have both beads broken.

There are two different beads on a rim. I call them the "easy side" and the "other side that doesn't matter". The non-mounting-surface-side is the one you want to work with. More on this later...Use your foot to push the sidewall in to the narrower part in the center of the rim.

Grab the bead directly across from where you're standing on the sidewall.

Hold what you've just accomplished from slipping back behind the rim and grab more bead with another tool.

You're going to keep walking the bead off the rim. This is another area where if you're trying hard, you're doing it wrong. You may have to grab less with each movement. A lubricant such as dishsoap can help here. Sometimes you have to get the first spoon out of there (the one I'm standing on) to give yourself some slack to work with.
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Old 10-19-2009, 07:27 PM   #2
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Got rid of the first spoon to give myself more sidewall to work with.

Walk the rest of the bead off

Now you can see why we started on the side we did. The rim gets narrower close to the bead on the "easy side". We work with that side only because it gives us more sidewall to work with (not going to get technical with geometry of circles here). The side still in the tire is the side we just walked the bead off of.

Sometimes you can work the rim out similar to the way we did the first bead. Sometimes a hammer can be used to walk the spoon around.

This rim was nasty as someone had used fix-a-flat at some point and it was just an old, crusty rim I found for my spare tire. In this case, you can use your handy-dandy hi-lift. Use your brain here. You can destroy your tire or probably hit yourself in the face or something. Again, work harder not smarter (or was it the other way around?) Soap can be a big help here again. Sometimes you can use your foot in the center of the rim and pull/pry it out. This method works really well with a friend, but I had just slammed my shin while moving my axles and didn't want the bead near my shin.
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Old 10-19-2009, 07:30 PM   #3
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Now you've got the rim out.

This is a good time to patch torn sidewalls, mess with your valve stem (can usually be done with just one bead broken), or if you've de-beaded your tire on the trail, you should just start here.
You can buy these vulcanizing patches at NAPA along with cement and/or vulcanizing compound. You should really carry these in your tire patch kit.


Now we're going to install a new rim. Again, there is an "easy side" that you want to be working with.

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Old 10-19-2009, 07:31 PM   #4
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Shove the rim into the tire with a twisting motion. I've actually had these pop all the way in without using any tools, so get as much done by hand before you start with the bars.

Use a rolling motion to get the spoon back out without un-doing the work.


Walk around the rim until you get the whole thing inside the tire.

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Old 10-19-2009, 07:32 PM   #5
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Note how I'm using my feet to keep the bead from coming back off the rim. I usually can't use two spoons here because I need the slack in the sidewall.

Keep walking the bead around the rim like you've already done 3 times.

Sometimes the hi-lift can come in handy again here. Interco's have such a thick bead they can be a little more difficult than most tires.



I'm not going to get into how to re-set the beads. I think that will just cause arguments on the safety of various different ways. I've done starting fluid, used an 11 gal. air tank, etc. You can use starting fluid safely if you have a brain about it, but if you are taking that route, I have some experience to share...The pressure and heat can weaken the glue between the metal insert in your standard rubber valve stems. I use metal valve stems because of this. I would recommend removing the stem all-together for various reasons, but at least pull out the schrader valve. I won't deny the possibility of starting fluid being the only way to get back to the trailhead. That is why I carry epoxy and hose clamps. I have repaired stems that the insert shot (yes, shot) out of by coating it with epoxy and clamping it together.
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Old 10-19-2009, 07:55 PM   #6
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

nice tutorial.
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:25 PM   #7
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Good step-by-step Thanks for the info!
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:35 PM   #8
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Nice write up. It's good to see some useful information being posted sometimes.
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Old 10-19-2009, 10:15 PM   #9
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Starting fluid is about the only way to seat those big buggers. I actually learned that trick working in a tire shop years ago. Do not buy Shucks fluid though, most be eco friendly or something because it doesn't work for sh..... Napa and Walmart.
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Old 10-20-2009, 01:13 PM   #10
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

I've alway's been a fan of using a 2" ratchet around the circumfrence of the tire. I've never used starting fluid. I even did it once at Jim creek stuck in the beaver ponds with silty sludge in the bead, using nothing but a ratchet strap and one of those Wal-Mart air compressors. Sounds like getting shot in the eye with a valve stem core is 100% more painful than using a ratchet strap. I need to call up HF to get some spoons though.
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Old 10-20-2009, 03:04 PM   #11
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

six robblees has better bars.

Those $6 bars you have are for use with tire machines.
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Old 10-20-2009, 07:17 PM   #12
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Thumbs up Re: Trail Tire Repair

Great thread!

Sticky!
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Old 10-20-2009, 09:12 PM   #13
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Awesome, thanks Brook.
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Old 10-20-2009, 10:10 PM   #14
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

owenst7 - Thank you, please enjoy your free 1 year Full Membership.
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Old 07-25-2012, 06:56 PM   #15
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

[QUOTE=banwuin1;552337]You can destroy your tire or possibly strike your do it yourself within your cope with or something. Again, run more challenging not smarter (or was it another way around?) washing soap could possibly be considered an enormous help right here again. occasionally you can use your foot within your center belonging using the rim and pull/pry it out. This method competencies severely properly using a friend, but I experienced just slammed my shin although switching my axles and didn't want the bead near to my shin.


Translation please.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:22 PM   #16
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

It's a spam bot
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:27 PM   #17
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

die spammer!
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Old 08-23-2013, 01:59 PM   #18
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

How would you patch the side wall? It flexes so much at low pressure, it seems that it would "roll" the patch off the inside of the tire.
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Old 08-23-2013, 02:37 PM   #19
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

You can try but it most likely will not hold for long on a truck tire. On an AG type tire it will be fine.

OP, just wanted to mention, there are no "rims" in this thread, what you have are wheels.
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Old 08-23-2013, 02:48 PM   #20
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigtex View Post
How would you patch the side wall? It flexes so much at low pressure, it seems that it would "roll" the patch off the inside of the tire.
On those LTBs, I was only patching a small gash that I could barely poke a finger through, and there were only a couple cords broken. Also, being bias ply, the sidewalls have a lot more reinforcement (they are basically the same construction as the tread surface). Assuming all the prep work is done properly, good quality patches are used, and good vulcanizing compound is used, the patch will be chemically bonded to the rubber similar to a weld. That said, it's going to be very subjective based on where it's cut, how big it is, how severe, what direction, how big the tire is, etc. That's probably 90% of the reason most shops won't touch a cut sidewall. A common process with medium/heavy duty truck tires is a section repair, which involves a much bigger patch and is probably the ideal thing to do most of the time. I'm not terribly familiar with the process other than talking to friends that do it for a living.

A small update to this thread:
I now own a harbor freight tire changer that runs for around $40-$50. It works excellently for the price. I've used it to do a couple sets of 40"s now. It's not a professional machine, but it's a lot nicer than doing everything on the ground with spoons, and it works a little better than spoons alone on stock sized tires. Not to mention, I have yet to find a shop locally that can even mount anything bigger than a 37x12.50.

http://www.harborfreight.com/portabl...ger-69686.html
I currently have it bolted to a large pallet instead of the concrete, which allows me to stand on the pallet and keep it from moving around. The bead breaker is probably the most useful part, because it doesn't involve moving around a heavy hi-lift jack. It's not indestructible, but if you take your time and move around the tire like you would with a bearing race, it works great. You have to make sure that you have the arm as vertically as possible, but I haven't had any issues with my 39.5"x16.5"x15" Rockers, which are one of the widest **** tires I've ever messed with that were smaller than 44"s.
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Old 08-23-2013, 03:02 PM   #21
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Someone also taught me that you can remove your shrader valve and plug a vacuum line on to the valve stem to pull the beads off the rim. That's probably the coolest way I've seen, and most rigs have enough washer hose to use off a vacuum port to make it happen.

This was a fun night that involved two cut sidewalls, and ultimately driving home on the interstate with this one like this.

You can also use a piece of fishing line or bailing wire to stitch a cut closed, and then jam all the leaks shut with plugs if you're really in a bad spot. This one actually held 25 psi just fine, so we didn't have to get that fancy at 3am.
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Old 08-23-2013, 03:16 PM   #22
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Quote:
Originally Posted by nate View Post
You can try but it most likely will not hold for long on a truck tire. On an AG type tire it will be fine.

OP, just wanted to mention, there are no "rims" in this thread, what you have are wheels.
What's the difference between a rim and wheel? I don't think I've ever seen them differentiated.

The narrow section of the wheel is called the drop center BTW. Don't think I mentioned that in the thread. You can also get reversed wheels which can be handy for clearing calipers, but typically have very little backspacing and don't hold the outer bead as well.
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:21 PM   #23
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

My brother blew a sidewall on a semi while driving semi out in Chicken, AK we drove the front axle up onto a rock while using a tree as a ramp, after disconnecting doubles, no other trucker stopped so we stuffed an entire roll of trash bags and grocer bags as well, aired up to 40lbs on a 65-70psi front, drove with it tillwe reached tanacross
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:27 PM   #24
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Quote:
Originally Posted by owenst7 View Post
What's the difference between a rim and wheel? I don't think I've ever seen them differentiated.

The narrow section of the wheel is called the drop center BTW. Don't think I mentioned that in the thread. You can also get reversed wheels which can be handy for clearing calipers, but typically have very little backspacing and don't hold the outer bead as well.
A rim is the piece the tire is mounted to. Some setups do have two piece wheels, a rim and center. Mostly on older heavy duty trucks, farm tractors, earthmovers, etc.
A wheel is the rim and center, which is what most trucks and cars have.
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Old 08-24-2013, 12:06 AM   #25
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Default Re: Trail Tire Repair

Sounds like some farm boy logic....
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